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Everybody Loves A Good Drought - Stories from India's Poorest Districts

by P Sainath

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Product ID:16044

Language

English

Publisher

Penguin

ISBN

0140259848 - Year: 1996/20 - Pages: 470

Binding

Paperback

P Sainath
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Author: P Sainath
Publisher: Penguin
Year: 1996/20
Language: English
Pages: 470
ISBN/UPC (if available): 0140259848

Description

The poor in India are, too often, reduced to statistics. In the dry language of development reports and economic projections, the true misery of the 312 million who live below the poverty line, or the 26 million displaced by various projects, or the 13 million who suffer from tuberculosis gets overlooked. In this thoroughly researched study of the poorest of the poor, we get to see how they manage, what sustains them, and the efforts, often ludicrous, to do something for them.

We are shown, for example, the case of a road to a village built to benefit a tribe where only one member of the tribe lives. Or a major dairy development project which, two years and Rs 2 crores later, fails to yield an additional litre of milk. To make matters worse, a decade later, the villagers are left without a single stud bull! And, while these exercises to alleviate the lot of the poor carry on, the face of poverty does not change in the least. Mukta Kadam, for example, has seen her village displaced thrice by development projects. Kishan Yadav walks forty kilometers and more, pushing a bicycle carrying as much as 250 kg of coal, to earn ten rupees.

Although this book pays a great deal of attention to individual districts, the issues it raises are universal in their relevance. For the people who figure in this book typify the lives and aspirations of a large section of Indian society, and their stories present us with the true face of development.

P Sainath won several awards for the reports in this book. Among these were the European Commission’s Journalism Award, the PUCL Human Rights Journalism Award, the Statesman Rural Reporting Prize and the Raja-Lakshmi Award.

Contents

INTRODUCTION

Still Crazy After All These Years
A brief introduction to the absurd

The Trickle Up & Down Theory
Health in rural India

This Is the Way We Go to School
A look at rural education

And the Meek Shall Inherit the Earth
The problems of forced displacement

Beyond the Margin
Survival Strategies of the poor

Lenders, Losers, Crooks & Credit
Usury, debt and the rural Indian

Crime & No Punishment
Targeting the poor

Despots, Distillers, Poets & Artists
Characters of the countryside

Everybody Loves a Good Drought
Water problems, real and rigged

With Their Own Weapons
When the poor fight back

Poverty, Development & the Press

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

APPENDIX 1-THE OFFICIAL POVERTY LINE

APPENDIX 2-THE DISTRICTS-A FEW INDICATORS

GLOSSARY

REFERENCES

DISTRICT-WISE INDEX OF STORIES

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