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India's Electronics Sector - Policies, Practices and Lessons from China - ORF Occasional Paper #52 J
India's Electronics Sector - Policies, Practices and Lessons from China - ORF Occasional Paper #52 J

India's Electronics Sector - Policies, Practices and Lessons from China - ORF Occasional Paper #52 J

by R Swaminathan

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Product ID:33451

Language

English

Publisher

Observer Research Foundation

ISBN

N/A - Year: 2014 - Pages: 38

Binding

Paperback

R Swaminathan
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Author: R Swaminathan
Publisher: Observer Research Foundation
Year: 2014
Language: English
Pages: 38
ISBN/UPC (if available): N/A

Description

By 2020 the demand for electronic goods in India is expected to breach the US$400 billion mark, with the import bill estimated to set the country back by US$300 billion. In fact, it is expected to trump the energy import bill. India is staring at an import nightmare of unprecedented proportions that can push the country into a spiral of high imports that would necessarily require higher external and internal borrowings. There are several South American economies that have gone down that route for us to learn our lessons and not implode.

The National Policy on Electronics (NPE) 2012 is primarily aimed at ramping up India's Electronic Design and Manufacturing (ESDM) capability. It is by far the most comprehensive policy intervention in post-independent India to boost indigenous production of semiconductor components and chips. The policy comes on the back of a strong and sustained demand for consumer electronic goods that accounted for a hefty bill of US$125 billion last year.

However, just about 10 percent of India's consumption was produced internally; the rest was imported. In the last two decades China has become the second largest manufacturer of electronics goods in the world with its sales revenues crossing US$840 billion in 2013. This development must necessarily be seen in the context of China having overtaken the US in 2010 to become the world's dominant manufacturing economy. China beat its competitors in world manufacturing, notching up US$2.9 trillion in output in 2013. In contrast, the US generated US$2.43 trillion. The Indian sales revenues for the year 2012 stood at slightly above US $68 billion, less than even one-tenth the size of the Chinese juggernaut.

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