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Rainbow Rhymes of Tagore -  Roman Transliteration+English Translation (4 Vol Set)
Rainbow Rhymes of Tagore - Roman Transliteration+English Translation (4 Vol Set)

Rainbow Rhymes of Tagore - Roman Transliteration+English Translation (4 Vol Set)

by Rabindranath Tagore

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Product ID:32291

Language

Bi-Lingual

Publisher

Sahitya Akademi

ISBN

97888126032914 - Year: 2011 - Pages: 687

Binding

Hardcover

Rabindranath Tagore
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Author: Rabindranath Tagore
Translator(s)/ Editors(s): Utpal K Banerjee
Publisher: Sahitya Akademi
Year: 2011
Language: Bi-Lingual
Pages: 687
ISBN/UPC (if available): 97888126032914

Description

VOLUME : I - Humour and Satire

The streak of fun and frolics in Tagore’s luminous persona was amply manifest in his children’s rhymes in Chitra-Bichitra (1954-drown from Sahaj Path, 1929), Khapchhada (1936) and Chhadar Chhabi (1937), Rendered here in rhymes and meters as commensurate with Tagore as feasible.

While penning these poems-perhaps more as pleasant diversions form his more onerous genres of writings and paintings over the last decade of life – he brought up vivid scenes from Bengal’s rural and Semi-urban life; the nuances of the countryside; and intimate vignettes of Bengal’s private homes placing the rhymes in fairly familiar surroundings, he made some startling comments on stock characters or stock situations (Concretised in our times by Walter Lippman as ‘Stereotypes’).

Alternatively, he conceived of again never losing his humorous tone – primordial images of varying complexity to reflect universal behaviour-patterns (Visualized much later by Carl Jung as ‘Archetypes’).

VOLUME : II - Mother and Child

Interrogations and inquisitions between the curious child and her affectionate mother – or siblings – are liberally spelt out in Tagore’s Shishu (1903), Sishu Bholanath (1922), Chitra-Bichitra (1954, drawn from Sahaj Path, 1929) and Golpasalpa (1941), rendered here in full rhymes and commensurate meters as near Tagore as possible.

Although he had a relatively lonely childhood, Tagore’s imaginative pen recorded many poignant questions, quizzes and quests that would have a surprising freshness among any familial relationships.

These could be mother and child; mother, father and child; mother, teacher and child; sibling and sibling; mother; sibling and sibling; mother, neighborhood children and child; and finally, mother, society and child.

Through the looking glass of modern ‘Transactional Analysis’ of Eric Berns, new lights can be thrown at each of these relationships, especially judging by the appropriate age-group of the child undoubtedly looming in the poet’s mind.

VOLUME : III - Wish Fulfillment Foray

All growing children have wish-fulfillment dreams and desires that Tagore fascinatingly drew in Shishu (1903), Shishu Bholanath (1922) and Chitra-Bichitra (1954, drawn form sahaj path, 1929), rendered here in free-flowing rhymes and metrical patterns as close to Tagore as possible. These wishes are mostly aspirations whose fulfillments come in a partial and dynamic way, to a child’s dream world, even in a masked form.

These wish-fulfillment forays, most fascinatingly, follow a ‘planetary orbit’ form, where the mother life that solar centre – exercises a strong bond of affection – as a centripetal force – where the child eventually wishes to return. But this wish is countervailed by the transient ‘get-away’ wish – like the planet’s centrifugal force – away to nature’s kingdom, or, to masquerade as a boatman or security-guard, or, away to a never-never land. There is no Freudian libido and seldom any mythological allusion, barring once to Rama.

VOLUME : IV - Fantasy Poetry

Poetry of sheer magic, myth and mental fantasy can often have deep allegorical roots or have nuanced allusions to society and rural life, as seen in Tagore’s poems in Chitra-Bichitra (1954, drawn from sahaj path, 1929), Khapchhada (1930), Chhada (1937) and Galpasalpa (1941), - presented here in free-flowing rhymes and Tagore’s own meters as far as possible.

The absence of boundary between the possible and the impossible. The absence of boundary between the possible and the impossible, revealed in innumerable sight and sounds, constitutes the staple to Tagore’s fantasy.

By the time fantasy entered into Tagore’s rhymes in the late 1920s, there was already a parallel phase of fantasy creeping into his calligraphic oeuvre. By 1930-31, Tagore was a full-fledged painter and he proceeded to illustrate his literary nonsense in Khapchhada with over one hundred human portraits, drawn with an acute sense of line and rhythm. In Tagore’s fantasy poetry, he almost never took liberty with grammar and semantics, as many of his compatriot English poets did, like Lewis Carroll, John Lennon, Edward Lear and Chirstopher Isherwood.

Contents

VOLUME : I

Preface
Introduction

1. Traditional Nursery Rhyme (Cited by Tagore)
2. Chitra-Bichitra (The Illustrated and the Variegated)
3. Khapchhada (Figuratively ‘Nonsense Rhymes’)
4. Chhadar Chhabi (Children’s Rhymes with Illustrations)
5. Galpasalpa (stories and Anecdotes)
6. Glossary
7. Index to Pronunciation

VOLUME : II

Introduction

1. Shishu (The Child)
2. Shishu Bholaanaath (the Child Forgetful)
3. Chitra Bichitra (The Illustrated and the variegated)
4. Galpasalpa (stories and Anecdotes)
Glossary
Index to Pronunciation

VOLUME : III

Introduction

1. Shishu (The Child)
2. Shishu Bholaanaath (the Child Forgetful)
3. Chitra Bichitra (The Illustrated and the Variegated)
4. Glossary
5. Index to Pronunciation

VOLUME : IV

Introduction

1. Traditional Nursery Rhyme (Cited by Tagore)
2. Chitra-Bichitra (The Illustrated and the Variegated)
3. Khapchhada (Figuratively, ‘Nonsense Rhymes’)
4. Chhada (Nonsense Rhymes)
5. Galpasalpa (Stories and Anecdotes)
6. Glossary
7. Index to Pronunciation

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