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The Encyclopedia of the Indian Diaspora
The Encyclopedia of the Indian Diaspora

The Encyclopedia of the Indian Diaspora

by Brij V Lal

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Product ID:19852

Language

English

Publisher

Oxford University Press

ISBN

0195685601 - Year: 2007 - Pages: 416

Binding

Hardcover

Brij V Lal
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Author: Brij V Lal
Translator(s)/ Edito: Peter Reeves/Rajesh Rai
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Year: 2007
Language: English
Pages: 416
ISBN/UPC (if available): 0195685601

Description

The Encyclopedia of the Indian Diaspora is the first comprehensive survey of Indian communities around the world.
Over 30 contextual features show the initiatives taken by these communities and the contributions they have made both internationally and to their host societies, in areas as diverse as literature, cuisine, popular culture, sports and political life. The greater part of the book consists of 44 country/region profiles covering all parts of the world. Written by over 60 scholars from across the globe, most of whom are from the Diaspora, the encyclopedia provides insights into the experiences of a people about whom much is often assumed but little is actually known.
The recent expansion of the Indian Diaspora, now some 20-million strong and growing, is a social transformation of global significance. Many members of the Diaspora have reached the highest levels of global commerce and trade, international public services and diplomacy, the professions and academia. In addition, the creative literature from and about the Diaspora holds a distinctive and distinguished place in the world's literary imagination.
Written in an accessible style and illustrated with hundreds of photographs, documents and maps, The Encyclopedia of the Indian Diaspora is at once a work of profound scholarship as well as a reference work which will appeal to both members of the Diaspora as they seek to locate their place in a rapidly globalising world, and to those who wish to understand a major development in recent world history

REVIEWS

Movement of People to create diaspora communities have been one of the fundamental building blocks of our modern world. Among these movements, that of Indians out of South Asia has been particularly striking in its range and impact - from impover4ished indentured and contract labourers, to the highly educated professionals of the present day, all retain a distinctive sense of identity which has given them resilience and resourcefulness in another homeland. This encyclopedia is a most welcome addition to the growing body of literature on the Indian diaspora. Its combination of thematic and country case study organisation is most helpful, and its maps and illustrations are superb as a way of bringing the Indian experience to life. It should be a key source of information for all who want to know more about their Indian neighbours.

- Prof. Judith Brown, Beit Professor of the History of the Commonwealth, Balliol College, University of Oxford.

Coming t a time when the Indian diaspora is emerging as an important community influencing global changes, this encyclop0edia will go a long way towards documenting the various cultures and histories that have into its making. It will constitute a standard reference for instiutions and individuals in the academy and in public life. A timely and impressive achievement.

- Prof. Dipesh Chakrabarty, Lawrence A Kimpton Distinguished Service Professor, Department of South Asian Languages and Civilization, History, and the College, University of Chicago

We know that we l;ive in a globalising world, but do we know fully how that world has been globalized? The encyclopedia of the Indian Diaspora documents one of the world's great diasporic movements, illuminating the history of Indian enterprise beyond India and providing the first well-focussed source by which Indian throughout the world may appreciate their achievments. Professors Brij V Lal, Peter Reeves and their collaborators deserve the appreciation of scholars and all those people in the world whose legacy includes the heritage of India.

- Prof Emeritus Frank Conlon, Professor Emeritus of History, South Asian Studies and Contemporary Religion, University of Washington

There has long been extensive migeration within India by labourers as well as by creative émigré minorities. For even longer, Banias migerated across the Indian Ocean and into inner Asia. Such movements have been simultaneously and subsequently capped by three major extensions by Indian migrants beyond India. First, by the 1.5 million indentured labourers sernt to mostly British colonies; along with them 5 million recruited in other ways for Burma, Ceylon and Malaya; and then the huge movement of hard-workingh retail traders and highly skilled professionals to all quarters of the globe. In the words of its Geneakl Editior, this volume seeks to promote a more nuanced understanding of the emornmous diversity iof thwe Indian diaspora which has resulted. It does so magnificently.

- Emiritus Professor Anthony Low, Former Vice-Chancellor, The Australian National University; and former Smuts Professor of the History of the Commonwealth, University of Cambridge.

Contents

FOREWORD

CONTRIBUTORS

INTRODUCTION

GUIDE TO THE USE OF THE ENCYCLOPEDIA AND EDITORIAL CONVENTIONS

INTRODUCTION

THE CONTEXT:

PART I-THE INDIAN CONTEXT:

1. India as Homeland.
2. The land.
3. Historic India.
4. Modern India: colonial rule and its effects.
5. The development of nationalism.
6. Divided nation.
7. Independence and partition.
8. The Indian Union since 1950.

PART II-AGE OF MERCHANTS:

1. Indian maritime communities.
2. The Indian Caravan trade.
3. The Haj Before 1800.
4. Indian Slavery, Labour migration and the export of skills.

PART III-THE AGE OF COLONIAL CAPITAL:

1. Convict migration.
2. The indenture system.
3. The Kangani and Maistry Systems.
4. Free migration.
5. Trading networks in Southeast Asia.

PART IV-THE AGE OF GLOBALISATION:

1. Post-war migration.
2. The migration of professionals.
3. Remittances.
4. Business and entrepreneurship.

PART V-INDIA LEADERSHIP AND THE DIASPORA:

1. Nationalist India: forging An emotional bond.
2. Disengaging from the Diaspora.
3. Coming full circle.

PART VI-LIFE IN THE DIASPORA:

1. Language.
2. Religious traditions in the Diaspora.
3. Popular culture.
4. Cuisine.
5. Sport around the Indian Diaspora.

PART VII-VOICES FROM THE DIASPORA:

1. The old plantation Diaspora of classic capital.
2. The new Indian Diaspora of late capital.
3. A 'Minor' literature.

THE COMMUNITIES

PART VIII-REGIONS AND COMMUNITIES:

1. South Asia.
2. Southeast Asia.
3. East Asia.
4. Central Asia.
5. Middle east.
6. Africa and the Indian ocean.
7. The Caribbean and South America.
8. North America.
9. Europe.
10. Australasia and Oceania.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

LIST OF FIGURES, TABLES AND MAPS

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PICTURE CREDITS

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