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The Mother Supreme - Mahamayi
The Mother Supreme - Mahamayi

The Mother Supreme - Mahamayi

by Chandrasekhar Kambar

Your Price: $14.75
In Stock.

Product ID:14297

Language

English

Publisher

National School of Drama

ISBN

N/A - Year: - Pages: 80

Binding

Paperback

Chandrasekhar Kambar
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Author: Chandrasekhar Kambar
Translator(s): Laxmi Chandrashekar
Publisher: National School of Drama
Year:
Language: English
Pages: 80
ISBN/UPC (if available): N/A

Description

The form Kambar has perfected in The Mother Supreme is a result of an integration of three independent discourses-drama, narration and poetry. It embodies a dialogic structure and a dramatic conflict, employs narrative and descriptive devices and exploits the suggestive potential of poetic language which operates simultaneously on multiple levels. It is the creation of a rare artist who combines in himself al the three roles-dramatist, poet and novelist-effectively. The tone and movement of the play are marked by a similar diversity. They range form the irreverently comic as in the scenes involving the court jester to the deeply tragic as in the last scene of the play. It has an amazing range of symbols drawn from various sources and for its sheer visual and imaginative power it has few parallels in the whole range of contemporary Kannada or for that matter Indian drama.

Sanjiva the hero of the play the Mother supreme is a physician and it sis his duty to cue he ailing patients, a vocation which is almost a struggle with death. His mother who is Goddess of death helps her son to cure the patients by appearing on the right side of the patients. Mortals who are the victims of death cannot understand death. The play has answered the challenge posed by death by asserting the freedom of human will and the honest love of the hero for dying princess. However sorrowful and meaningless life may be, man cannot let his only life rot away in this manner. The hero denies the power of death over life but not death itself which he accepts as a fact of human condition.

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