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The Rig Veda  -  And the History of India
The Rig Veda - And the History of India

The Rig Veda - And the History of India

by David Frawley

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Product ID:32576

Language

English

Publisher

Aditya Prakashan

ISBN

9788177421088 - Year: 2012 - Pages: 364

Binding

Paperback

David Frawley
Shipping Note: This item usually arrives at your doorstep in 10-15 days

Author: David Frawley
Publisher: Aditya Prakashan
Year: 2012
Language: English
Pages: 364
ISBN/UPC (if available): 9788177421088

Description

There were two main Vedic cultures in ancient India. The first was a northern kingdom centered on the Sarasvati-Drishadvati river region dominated by the Purus and the Ikshvakus that produced the existent Veda texts that we have.

The second was a southern culture along the coast of the Arabian Sea and into the Vindhya Mountains, dominated by the Turvashas and Yadus and extending into groups yet further south.

These northern and southern groups vied for supremacy and influenced each other in various ways as the Vedas and Puranas indicate. The northern or Bharata culture ultimately prevailed, making India the land of Bharata or Bharatavarsha and its main ancient literary record the Vedas, though militarily the Yadus remained strong throughout history. The southern culture was the older of the two with the Vedic people coming originally from the south, not the northwest. This was the basis of the maritime symbolism at the core of Vedic thought, which reflects an ancient heritage.

In addition, there was a third or northwest Vedic culture in Punjab and Afghanistan, that of the Anus and Druhyus, which was at first part of the northern kingdom but gradually developed its own identity. It was partly assimilated by the Bharatas that became the dominant northern people. Another portion of it extended north and west outside of the Indian subcontinent. Its influence was secondary to that of the northern and southern kingdoms and much of it passed out of the Indic sphere of culture. However, it was the basis of the most of the Indo-European and Iranian peoples and cultures that we find in Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East.

Therefore, we must look at the south and east connections to understand not only Indic civilization and Hinduism, but also to understand the Vedas themselves. The western connections to the Europeans and Iranians were more an outflow, while the southern connections were more original and enduring.

Western scholars, dominated by a European mindset, only traced Indo-European culture from Europe and the Middle East to India as its eastern border. They failed to see that the boundary was only in their minds.

Contents

Contents

Foreword by N.S. Rajaram
Preface

PART I : INTRODUCTION
Summary of Conclusion

CHAPTER ONE
The Rig Veda as a Document of Both Rishis and Kings

CHAPTER TWO
The Early Era : Manu, Ila, Nahusha and Yayati

PART II : THE MAIN DYNASTIES OF THE RIG VEDA

CHAPTER THREE
The Main Bharata Divodasa-Bharadvaja Line of Kings

CHAPTER FOUR
The Trasadasyu Dynasty and the Ikshvakus

CHAPTER FIVE
The Srinjayas, the Main Dynasty of the Later Rig Veda

CHAPTER SIX
The Decline of the Srinjaya-Panchalas and the Rise of the Kurus

PART III : IMPLICATIONS

CHAPTER SEVEN
Expansions of the Vedic People

CHAPTER EIGHT
Geographical References : The Ocean and Soma

CHAPTER NINE
Lineages of the Sears of the Rig Veda

CHAPTER TEN
The Kuru Dynasty and Krishna

PART IV : CONCLUSIONS

CHAPTER ELEVEN
Related Peoples 1 : Iran, Mesopotamia and South India

CHAPTER TWELVE
Related People 2 : The Europeans. The Children of Danu

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
Summary of Vedic-Puranic Concordance

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
Sanskritization : A New Model of Language Development

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Establishing a Time Line

CHAPTER SIXTEEN
Conclusion : Cultural Implications

Bibliography
Index

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