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To Catch a Poem - An Anthology  for Young People
To Catch a Poem - An Anthology for Young People

To Catch a Poem - An Anthology for Young People

by Sampurna Chattarji

Your Price: $14.95
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Product ID:33302

Language

English

Publisher

Sahitya Akademi

ISBN

9788126042500 - Year: 2014 - Pages: 184

Binding

Paperback

Sampurna Chattarji

Author: Sampurna Chattarji
Vivek Tandon/Several Contributors
Translator(s)/ Editors(s): Anju Makhija/Jane Bhandari
Publisher: Sahitya Akademi
Year: 2014
Language: English
Pages: 184
ISBN/UPC (if available): 9788126042500

Description


To Catch a Poem introduces young people to the wonderful, whacky world of poetry. This imaginative collection ranging from binary poems to ghosts and environmental issues is firmly rooted in the Indian milieu. Youngsters can easily relate to these poems contributed by some of India’s best-loved writers.

Mostly, words express simple ideas and emotions, such as being hungry, tined or sleepy, angry or in love. If you only read magazines, listen to pop music, or watch TV, you may never discover that words have a secret life of their own. Poets, of course, know all about it and are generally eager to share their discovery.

How does a poem come into being? Sometimes it just flits along, whistling airily, and the poet catches it in mid-air, like a butterfly, and sets it down on the page. But many poems refuse to be captured so easily:

SS Prasad writes that it can be like trapping wild elephants! Using every wile available, the poet stalks the poem, pounces…and misses. Never mind! He gets up and tries again. Or else he goes to bed and at three in the morning, a poem wakes him from his dreams, all ready to be written down, driving him out of bed to hunt for paper and pen before it gets away from him. Many writers actually sleep with a notebook under the pillow. Even then, our sleepy poet may find himself frantically chasing some elusive lines that have vanished into the dark.

Some poems are inherently neat and tidy, while others arrive looking crumpled and messy, with extra ‘bits’ sticking to them. Then the poet must clean up, or edit, the poem, a process that can go on forever. You might wonder how he ever gets his unruly poem safely down on paper. Often a poet has looked at his verses, just waiting to be published, and has thought, oh no, that line needs to be removed, and this stanza would read better here…and that line would be better there…and so it goes. The page is full of crossings-out and lines meander round the margins, upside down and back-to-front. But finally, it’s done, and our poet contemplates his work with satisfaction.





About The Editors:

Anju Makhija has published several books of poetry, translation, plays and children’s fiction/TV scripts. She has also co-edited anthologies related to partition poetry, Women’s verse and Indo-English theatre. Her awards include: The National Educational Film Festival Award, USA (’85); The All-India Poetry Prize (’94); The BBC World Poetry Award (’02); and the Sahitya Akademi Translation Prize (’11).


Jane Bhandari has published two collections of poems, Single Bed and Aquarius, and two children’s books, The Long Thin Jungle and The Round Square Chapatti. Her poems have been anthologized in 60 Indian Poets (Penguin) and We Speak In Changing Languages (Sahitya Akademi) and appear in several other anthologies and websites.

Contents

Contents

Introduction

SAMPURNA CHATTARJI
I’m Sick of Learning Lochinvar
Word-Balloon
Boys Meant Skinny
On Blushes, Jealousy And Skirts
The Electric Caterpillar

ADIL JUSSAWALLA
To the Tune of a Swing in a Muncipal Park
On My Own Feet
Turning the Tables
The Good-For-Nothing
Geography Lessons
Jugalbandi
Christmas Card
Three Ships

PRIYA SARUKKAI CHABRIA
The Six Blind Men and the Elephant
The Rolling Cheeses
The Ass laden with Sponges and the Ass laden with Salt
The Frog Prince
Nursery Rhyme
Childhood Tree

VIVEK TANDON
Loopy Limericks
Slyly Stopping Woods on a Snowy Evening
The Wizard That Was
Joint Family, at Night
Feline
Knicknacks

MUSTANSIR DALVI
Coins, Watches and Teeth
Square Sun
My Room

S. S. PRASAD
S S Prasad, B.E.
Elegy to the Postman
Nanobharatha
Like a Kasturi Deer
At Least Six Differences Between Two Pictures
Binary Poems

JEET THAYIL
The Man Who Married Water
How to Be a Toad
How to Be a Leaf
How to Be a Horse
How to Be a Crow

ROHINTON DARUWALA
Biscuits
Galerian
The Last of the Whools
Masson the Rat
The Star-Spangled Kutta
The Wurble-Puss of Jam Tree Gully

JANE BHANDARI
Cat
Navy Week
Kathakali Trains
Elephants on the Track
Catching Crayfish
Breakfast on the Horizon
New Eyes

KEKI N. DARUWALLA
A Ghost Story
Introducing the Doe
Introducing the Stag
The Ghost
Dark Night

SIVAKAMI VELLIANGIRI
The Great Compound Wall
File Photos
Daddy-Long-Legs
The Tree House
Anti-Madness
Numbering with the Nuns

ANJU MAKHIJA
Hair You Go Again
First Crush
Pranks
The Coconut Tree
Poltergeist
The Train Vendor
The Marooned

TEMSULA AO
The Doll
Lament for an Earth
Bat-Cloud
Fire-Fly
The Bald Giant

RANDHIR KHARE
Once
Owl Night
Requiem
Colors
It’s Curiosity
Lizard

SHANTA ACHARYA
Testing the Nation
If only I Were:
The Wishing Tree
The Cook And the Chickpea
Imagine

R.J. KALPANA
SO, I Am Me
Summer Afternoons
Not So Simple

POEMS BY STUDENTS FROM RISHI VALLEY SCHOOL
An English Breakfast Crosses the Limits of Desire
Encounter with Machine
The Scorpion
Plants that Grow Faster than Bamboo
Rain in Afghanistan
Weaver
Askew
Conundrum
My Sister
A Glimpse of My Great Grandmother
Bombay

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