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Amar Chitra Katha - Set of 20 Books :  Buddhist and Jataka Tales
Amar Chitra Katha - Set of 20 Books : Buddhist and Jataka Tales

Amar Chitra Katha - Set of 20 Books : Buddhist and Jataka Tales

by Anant Pai

Your Price: $74.95
In Stock.

Product ID:13743

Language

English

Publisher

India Book House

ISBN

817508et. Al - Year: 2003-04-01 - Pages: 650

Binding

Paperback

Anant Pai

Author: Anant Pai
Arvind Mandrekar/Luis M Fernandes
Editor(s): Anant Pai
Publisher: India Book House
Year: 2003-04-01
Language: English
Pages: 650
ISBN/UPC (if available): 817508et. Al

Description

1. THE HIDDEN TREASURE

VOL- 617

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. The Buddha was no exception. Legend has it that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva came in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

2. The Queen’s Necklace and Other Tales from Jatakas

VOL- 714

The Jatakas on which the present title is based is a collection of five hundred and fifty stories, included in the Pali canon. They are tales in which the life of Bodhisatva in his previous births is narrated. The Boddhisatva is one, who by performing virtuous, king and intelligent acts, aspires to become a Buddha.

Jataka tales are based on folklore, legends and ballads of ancient India. We cannot assign a definite date to the Jataka stories. Taking into account archaeological and literary evidence it seems likely that they were compiled in the period, third century B C to fifth century A D. They give us invaluable information about ancient Indian civilization, culture and philosophy.

The Jataka stories have been very popular in the Buddhist world. These stories have been translated into almost all the languages of the Buddhist countries such as Chinese, Tibetan, Sinhalese, Siamese, Burmese, Japanese and also into many modern European languages. These stories have encouraged painting and sculpture in ancient India and other Buddhist counties. Sanchi, Bharhut, Amaravati and Ajanta in India, Borobudur in Java, Pegan in Burma and Sukhodaya in Thailand bear testimony to the popularity of these tales.

3. Vasavadatta – The Popular Story as told in Buddhist Lore

VOL- 674

The story of King Udayana and Princessvasavadatta was very well known in ancient India. Early writers wereinspired by this story and made it the subject of poems and dramas. Bhasa wrote the Swapnavasavadatta in Sanskrit,which isuniques for its literary value. Vasavadatta by Subandhu isanothergreat work on the sametheme.

King Pradyota of Ujjaini isdistrubed to learn from hisminister that Udayana of Kaushambi is a greater king than he is. Hetricks Udayana into captivity. Buthis daughter Vasavadatta and Udayana fall in love. How Udayana escapes with Vasavadatta is told inpictures in the following pages.

4. The Priceless Gem

VOL- 672

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. Siddhartha who became the Buddha was no exception. It is believed several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva go into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva has come in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he has spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

According to the Maha Ummagga Jataka, the Bodhisattva was once born as Aushadha Kumar who was endowed with celestial knowledge and superhuman powers. The present issue of Amar Chitra Katha presents the second set of the tales connected with Aushadha Kumar.

The first title, The Battle of Wits, presented the tales connected with the childhood of Aushadaha Kumar. This issue presents stories of Aushadha Kumar at the court of Mithila.

5. The Actobat-Buddhist Tales

Vol. 668

Gautama, as we all know, left home to discover a way to end all human misery. He became Buddha, the enlightened One, when one day in a flash the truth dawned on him as he sat meditating under the Bodhi tree in Gaya.

The path he advocated was the well-known eight-fold path-right speech, right action and right means of livelihood to achieve control on the physical plane; right exertion, right-mindedness and right meditation to achieve mental strength and right resolution and right point of view for intellectual development.

That these guidelines, when adhered to, bring peace of mind is borne out by the Buddhist tales that have come down to us. A few such tales have been included in this Chitra Katha.

6. The Deadly Feast

VOL- 665

According to legend, several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva has come in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he has spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

These tales are based on the folklore, legends and ballads of ancient India. We cannot assign a definite date to the Jataka stories. Taking into account archaeological and literary evidence it appears that they were compiled in the period, the third century B C to the fifth century A D. They give us invaluable information about ancient Indian civilization, culture and philosophy.

According to Maha Ummagga Jataka, the Bodhisattva was once born as Aushadha Kumar who was endowed with celestial knowledge and superhuman powers. Earlier, we had published the stories of Aushadha Kumar’s childhood (Battle of Wits) and his early life at the court of Mithila (The Priceless Gem). This issue of Amar Chitra Katha presents Aushadha Kumar in the role of the chief minister of Mithila.

7. King Kusha

VOL- 664

King Kusha is an adaptation of the Kusha Jataka, one of the five hundred and fifty stories included in the Pali canon. The Jataka tales are woven round the life of the Bodhisattva, who lived many lives on this earth before he evolved into the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Jataka stories have been very popular in the Buddhist world. These stories have not only been translated into almost all the languages closely related to Buddhism – Chinese, Tibetan, Sinhalese, Siamese, Burmese, Japanese- but also into many modern European languages. These stories have also been depicted in the paintings and sculptures of ancient India and other Ajanta in India, Borobudur in Java, Pegan in Burma and Sukhodaya in Siam bear testimony to the popularity of these tales.

8. AMRAPALI AND UPAGUPTA

VOL-635

Lord Buddha attached more importance to the emancipation of the masses than to the salvation of the individual. His concern for the masses manifested itself in the establishment of the Sangha, which could be best described as an association of seekers.

The story of Amrapali is told in the Maha-Parinibbana Sutta and in Malasarvastivadas. The garden which Amrapali gave up to Lord Buddha was still in existence when Fa-Hien visited India during the Gupta age.

Upagupta was a disciple of Buddha. For him, ahimsa (non-violence) did not merely mean desisting fro violence but doing positive good and showing compassion, When Vasavadatta was shunned by society and had nowhere to go, Upagupta took her to his hermitage.

While adapting this story for our Amar Chitra Katha, we have omitted a few gruesome details.

9. Jataka Tales – Nandi Vishala and Other Stories

VOL- 619

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. Siddhartha who became the Buddha was no exception. It is believed several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva go into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva has come in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he has spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

10. JATAKA TALES – TALES OF MISERS

VOL- 616

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. The Buddha was no exception. Legend has it that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva came in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

11. Jataka Tales – Stories of Courage

VOL- 615

The Jataka tales are a veritable treasure of Indian folklore, legend and fable. Each time these popular stories are told, they acquire a new colour and fresh dimension. Besides being entertaining, the Jataka tales give us invaluable information about ancient Indian civilization, culture and philosophy.

The Jataka tales recount the stories of the previous incarnations of Boddhisattva before he became the Buddha, or the Enlightened One. The Boddhisatva came in many forms-man, monkey, elephant, lion, deer etc. Whatever his mortal form, in each story, the bodhisattva spread the message of justice and wisdom. The present collection includes a selection of fascinating animal tales on the theme of courage.

12. JATAKA TALES – TRUE FRIENDS

VOL- 614

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. Siddhartha who became the Buddha was no exception. It is believed several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva go into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva has come in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he has spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

Many Jataka tales have been retold in the Amar Chitra Katha series. This volume present a set of tales of true friendship among human beings.

13. Jataka Tales-The Mouse Merchant and the Invaluable Treasure

VOL- 576

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. Siddhartha who became the Buddha was no exception. It is believed several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva go into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva has come in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he has spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

These tales are based on the folklore, legends and ballads of ancient India. We cannot assign a definite date to the Jataka stories. Taking into account archaeological and literary evidence it appears that they were compiled in the period, the third century B C to the fifth century A D. They give us invaluable information about ancient Indian civilization, culture and philosophy.

This volume of deer stories will keep children amused, while never failing to point out the ultimate triumph of good over evil.

14. JATAKA TALES STORIES OF WISDOM

VOL- 586

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. The Buddha was no exception. Legend has it that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva came in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

15. JATAKA TALES - BIRD STORIES

VOL- 573

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. The Buddha was no exception. Legend has it that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva came in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

This volume of bird stories will keep children amused, while never failing to point out the ultimate triumph of good over evil.

16. JATAKA TALES DEER STORIES

VOL- 555

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. The Buddha was no exception. Legend has it that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva came in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

This volume of deer stories will keep children amused, while never failing to point out the ultimate triumph of good over evil.

17. JATAKA TALES ELEPHANT STORIES

VOL- 554

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. The Buddha was no exception. Legend has it that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva came in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

Amar Chitra Katha has already brought to the reader Jataka monkey stories and Jataka deer stories. In this issue we bring you elephant tales that will teach some of the truths that the bodhisattva experienced in his numerous lives on earth.

18. JATAKA TALES JACKAL STORIES

VOL- 553

All living creatures die to be born again, so the Hindus believe. The Buddha was no exception. Legend has it that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva went into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened One.

The Bodhisattva came in many forms – man, monkey, deer, elephant, lion. Whatever his mortal body, he spread the message of justice and wisdom, tempered with compassion. This wisdom, the wisdom of right thinking and right living, is preserved in the Jataka tales.

19. JATAKA TALES MONKEY STORIES

VOL- 543

The Jatakas on which the present title is based is a collection of five hundred and fifty stories, included in the Pali canon. They are tales in which the life of Bodhisatva in his previous births is narrated. The Bodhisatva is one, who by performing virtuous, kind and intelligent acts, aspires to become a Buddha.

The present book is a collection of a few Jataka stories in which the bodhisattva is born as a monkey. We hope, in the words of Prof. Rhys Davids that we may still turn with appreciation to the ancient book of the Buddhist Jataka tales as a priceless record of the childhood of our race.

20. THE GIANT AND THE DWARF

VOL- 575

All living creatures die to be born again – so the Hindus believe. Siddhartha who became the Buddha was no exception. It is believed that several lifetimes as a Bodhisattva go into the making of the Buddha, the Enlightened one.

These tales are based on then folklore, legends and ballads of ancient India. We cannot assign a definite date to the Jataka stories. Taking into account archaeological and literary evidence it appears that they were compiled in the period, the third century B C to the fifth century A.D. They give us invaluable information about ancient Indian civilization, culture and philosophy.

This volume of deer stories will keep children amused, while never failing to point out the ultimate triumph of good over evil.

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