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Does Civil Society Matter? - Governance in Contemporary India
Does Civil Society Matter? - Governance in Contemporary India

Does Civil Society Matter? - Governance in Contemporary India

by Rajesh Tandon

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Product ID:11821

Language

English

Publisher

Sage Publications

ISBN

0761996850 - Year: 2003 - Pages: 378

Binding

Paperback

Rajesh Tandon

Author: Rajesh Tandon
Editor(s): Rajesh Tandon/ Ranjita Mohanty
Publisher: Sage Publications
Year: 2003
Language: English
Pages: 378
ISBN/UPC (if available): 0761996850

Description

Broadening our understanding of the nature of civil society and good governance while providing insights into the efficacy of collective action by marginalized group, this volume will be of interest to scholars of political science, and social and political activists.

The modern state is increasingly capable of dominating the social, political and economic spheres of an individual's and a community life. This intrusion and the consequent infringement of freedom and autonomy have raised questions about the legitimate boundaries of state power. It has also given rise to debates on how civil society can demand and ensure good governance.

In this framework, this volume explores the analyses civil society initiatives which address and impact on issues of good governance. It makes a cogent case for broadening the conceptualization of governance so as to rescue it from the widely prevalent view that governance is the sole responsibility of the state. The contributors argue that the people must be given the space to decide what is good for them and for defining their version of governance.

The volume is divided into two section. The part deals with conceptual and theoretical issues concerning the interface between civil society and governance. Among the important aspects discussed are:

The concept of civil society as a third sphere
Establishing a balance between the state, the market and civil society
The ways in which ordinary citizens can make the state accountable

The second part presents five case studies of assertions in the sphere of civil society which substantiate the theoretical insights presented in the first section. This empirical evidence relates to:

The Chilika Bachao Andolan in Orissa 'The Chattisgarh Mukti Morcha
Dalit assertions in the Meerut region of Uttar Pradesh
The Struggle of the pavement dwellers in Mumbai to be accorded a place in civil society
The fight of Kol tribals in Uttar Pradesh to secure the rights provided to them by the state.

Contents

Preface and Acknowledgements

Introduction
Civil Society and Governance: Issues and Problematics

A Critique of the Notion of Civil Society as the 'Third Sphere'

The Civil Society - Governance Interface: An Indian Perspective

The Crisis of Governance

Civil Society and the Goal of Good Governance

Corruption and the Right to Information

Save the Chilika Movement: Interrogating the State and the Market

When the Voiceless Speak: A Case Study of the Chhatisgarh Mukti Morcha

Democratic Governance, Civil Society and Dalit Protest

A View from the Subalterns: The Pavement Dwellers of Mumbai

Land Distribution fro Kol Tribals in Uttar Pradesh

References
About the Editors and Contributors
Index

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