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Temples at Srisailam
Temples at Srisailam

Temples at Srisailam

by V Anuradha

Your Price: $119.50
In Stock.

Product ID:9244

Language

English

Publisher

Agam Kala Prakashan

ISBN

8173200351 - Year: 2000 - Pages: 293

Binding

Hardcover

V Anuradha

Author: V Anuradha
Publisher: Agam Kala Prakashan
Year: 2000
Language: English
Pages: 293
ISBN/UPC (if available): 8173200351

Description

This art volume is an in-depth study of all the temples of this place, their growth, rituals and life surrounding them along with a critical study of the Art and Architecture.

Srisailam in Andhradesa is a renowned ‘Saivakshetra’ and has a hoary past. Together with two more sacred Lingakshetras. Kalesvaram on the north and Daksharama on the east, constituted ancient Andhra, which was then known as Trilingadesa. In the early medieval period. Srisailam rose to prominence as a pilgrim center with Alampur, Umamahesvaram, Siddhesvaram and Tripurantakam serving as gateways, thus contributing to the colorful, religious and cultural life of the Andhras, Srisailam was referred as Sriparvata, Srisaila, Mallikarjunam, Parvatam, Srigiri, Srisaila Mallikarjunam, Parvatam, Srigiri, Srisaila Mallikarjunam and Srikailasa in many inscriptions, literary texts and the Puranas. It is rich in legend and religious tradition. Historically, this holy center with surrounding regions was associated with all dynasties that ruled Andhradesa. The main sects of Saivism: Pasuputas, Kalamukhas, Kapalikhas and Virasaivas along with Siddhas and Nathas enriched the religious life of Srisailam. The main temple complex: Bramaramba-Mallikharjuna flourished as a great center where Art and Architecture and religious cults grew to maturity.

The antiquity of the place is linked with sanctity. Therefore, it is difficult for any researcher to probe into the textual literary and Archaeological sources and date the temples along with the gods enshrined therein. The present work Anuradha Vemulapalli is an in-depth study of all the temples of this place, their growth, rituals and life surrounding them along with a critical study of the Art and Architecture. Iconography and inscriptions associated with them. The most important and substantial contribution is an exhaustive documentation of Prakara sculptural wealth.

For the first time, one gets a glimpse of the great ‘Saivakshetra’ of the Mallikarjuna temple complex through drawings and photo illustrations. Besides, an analytical and correlative study of inscriptions and the associated literature was attempted for the first time, bringing to light the religious history of Srisailam.

The book is of lasting value for students as well as scholars interested in the study of Saiva religious institutions and their activities.

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